December 16, 2009

Dear C4L Member,

Early tomorrow, the Senate Banking Committee is expected to vote on Ben Bernanke’s nomination to a second term as Federal Reserve Chairman.

Click here to get contact information for Senate Banking Committee members.

Chairman Bernanke has operated without any real accountability while printing trillions of dollars out of thin air and keeping interest rates artificially low, practices that continue the destruction of our dollar and will eventually plunge our economy into an even greater crisis.

But the real issue at stake during this confirmation process is transparency at the Fed.

No one – whether a “Person of the Year” or not – should be able to commit us to deals with foreign central banks or give taxpayer dollars to Wall Street while refusing to tell us who is receiving our money.

When you call the Senate Banking Committee members, urge them to join Senators Jim DeMint, David Vitter, Jim Bunning, and Bernie Sanders by calling for a hold on Bernanke’s confirmation until there is an up or down vote on Audit the Fed (S. 604).

If neither of your senators are on the Banking Committee, click here to contact Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and tell him it is long past time Audit the Fed receive a standalone vote on the Senate floor.

In Liberty,

John Tate

President

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Digital media is re-introduced into the equation with the presence of MIDI files. Think of MIDI files as digital sheet music. When a musician plays any instrument or sings any song, they sing on a timeline. Each note they hit is placed at a particular point in time and with varying levels of volume. MIDI files memorize digital signatures of when and how loud notes were struck. In other words, if a pianist was playing a keyboard that was recording MIDI information, the computer would log exactly when a note was played, and exactly how hard the key was struck. Later, the musician can take this file and open the timeline. When he or she does this, a timeline will open with dots and lines indicating the keystrokes. The pianist can then click on the dots and lines and move them around, manipulating the performance. This means that if the pianist accidently hits a note a few seconds too soon, they can simply go into the MIDI file and move the note back into place. If the pianist decides he or she should have played that note an octave higher or a bit louder – no problem; then note can simply be edited. MIDI files allow even terrible musicians to record tracks in perfection.

and there you have it

and there you have it

Utilizing MIDI files, the artist can go far beyond just correcting performance mistakes. Notes can be completely added. Perhaps the pianist can’t play a blues riff. No problem – the musician can click in the MIDI timeline and indicate where a note would need to be, and how loud the computer should play it. Remember also that MIDI files are only recording when in time the note was struck, and how hard the note was struck – not the actual instrument that was used to strike these notes. In other words, a pianist can record a banjo solo on his or her keyboard, take it into the MIDI file, and simply apply a sampled banjo sound to the MIDI track. It is possible for a musician to record an entire album complete with everything from a full string section to a didgeridoo and not know how to play a single instrument.